Continental Divide Trail #31: Made it to Wyoming!

I knew something was wrong when Og struggled down the trail toward me, instead of bounding as he usually did with trekking poles outstretched in greeting. “I’m really sick,” he said. “I can’t eat, and if I can’t eat, I can’t hike.” He looked as bedraggled as these trees. 


But with the indomitable spirit of the bald eagle in his photo above, Og made it over the CDT’s Colorado border into Wyoming. We succeeded in our goal of hiking from northern New Mexico to southern Wyoming, the section impassable because of snow last midsummer!  


I drove nine hours straight from Steamboat Springs, CO to pick up Og at the top of Battle Pass, WY, then across Wyoming and home to Boulder where he took a week off to recover from a viral gastroenteritus and exhaustion. 


But we’re not done yet! Since Og hiked the eastern side of the Collegiate Peaks when the western side was impassable with snow in late June, we’re now back to hike the higher, tougher, western side–the official CDT. Here we are, starting up at Monarch Pass.


Not to be outdone, Amber helped Nathan (the mascot of Tom and Sheila, see our previous post) earn his Boy Scout merit badge in kissing.


 

Continental Divide Trail #19: Susie Lindau’s Fitness Challenge!

Amber and I accepted Susie Lindau’s Wild Rider Fitness Challenge to get fit through outdoor adventure! Readers of my book, I Promise Not to Suffer: A Fool for Love Hikes the Pacific Crest Trail, know that I lost 22 pounds on 7,000 calories a day while hiking the PCT. But as trail angels supporting my husband Porter’s hike of the Continental Divide Trail, 3,100 miles from Mexico to Canada, we gotta have our own adventures while driving hours from trail-town to town and partying on the road.
We hiked in the Wind River Range of Wyoming!

Because hotel breakfasts.

We swam in hotel pools in Colorado.

cBecause margaritas in New Mexico!

We practiced yoga overlooking a river in Idaho.

Because hot fudge sundaes everywhere!

We climbed high passes for this view of the Tetons.

Because chocolate!

Amber and I recovered from our adventures in hot springs from New Mexico to Montana. Thanks, Susie! Fitness is a tough job but someone’s got to do it!

Continental Divide Trail #15: Yellowstone!

From Togwotee Pass through Grand Teton National Park and Yellowstone, we’ve met wonderful people and seen amazing sights.
Here I pick up Porter, as well as thru-hiker David Breinke (trail-name Problem Bear), at a trailhead for rides to their respective resupplies.


mapPorter plans his hiking route through Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks.


He goes through his bags of resupplies to repack his breakfasts, lunches, snacks, and dinners, almost two pounds of high-energy healthy food a day for the next several days.



One of our favorite parts of Yellowstone was the Black Sand Basin, with its geothermal pools, hot springs, and geysers. 


“Hotcha Mama!” Amber said of Old Faithful. “I’m sure it wants a selfie with me!”

Continental Divide Trail #14: Wyoming Wildlife

From grizzly bears and wolves to buffalo, Wyoming teems with wildlife.


Gail had a wild ride on the World’s Largest Jackalope!


We’re deep in grizzly and wolf country, and Porter saw these enormous wolf tracks on his way out of the Wind River Range.


We each carry bear spray on our hikes separately and together, here above Togwotee Pass.


Amber remains imperturbable.


A giant herd of buffalo caused a traffic jam on US 287!

Continental Divide Trail #13: Wind River Range, WY!

“The Continental Divide Trail is by far the most challenging outdoor adventure I’ve ever attempted,” Porter says, “and the Wind River Range is the most challenging and magnificent part of the CDT thus far.”

“I forded lots of wide, deep creeks, and prepared to swim with my pack on my back where the current was fast.”

“The snow above 10,000 feet in elevation was so deep that I often sank up to mid-thigh. I listened for the gurgle of icy creeks beneath. Navigation was tough because the trail was hidden under snow.”


Gail and Amber drove deep into the Wind River Range to meet Porter for his resupply.

We stayed in this wonderful cabin at Big Sandy Lodge, so remote there was no electricity, internet, or cell coverage–just plenty of time to hike and meditate. Natasha and Wes took great care of us, and Natasha made delicious breakfasts, bagged lunches, and dinners.



Porter arrived, and we opened a killer Malbec to drink from under our mosquito head nets.


 

 

Here are Gail and Amber hiking their own hike in the Wind River Range.


We were recently interviewed by the international Adventure Sports Podcast about both our Pacific Crest Trail and Continental Divide Trail adventures:  http://www.adventuresportspodcast.com/2015/06/ep-050-gail-and-porter-storey-hiking.html