The Making of a Thru-Hiker, Part 7: Gourmet Feasting on the Trail

My seventh post for “The Making of a Thru-Hiker” (in Women’s Adventure Magazine): Gourmet Feasting on the Trail

Gail's cafe mocha on the PCT

Gail’s cafe mocha on the PCT

I had my doubts about how well my husband, Porter, and I would eat on our hike of the Pacific Crest Trail, 2,663 miles from the border of Mexico to Canada.

“I’m a gourmet cook in the wilderness,” he said.

For the rest of the article, see Women’s Adventure Magazine:
http://www.womensadventuremagazine.com/hikingbackpacking/making-thru-hiker-part-7-gourmet-feasting-trail/

 

The Making of a Thru-Hiker, Part 6: Who’s Out There Besides You?

My sixth post for “The Making of a Thru-Hiker” column (in Women’s Adventure Magazine): Who’s Out There Besides You?

Gail and Porter with other hikers on the PCT, California

Gail and Porter with other hikers on the PCT, California

For the first couple of days of our hike of the Pacific Crest Trail, Porter and I didn’t see another soul. But on the third day, we sat down in the middle of the desert for lunch and watched a dusty figure approach across the vast sandy expanse of cacti and sage. Porter and I looked at each other. The trail had begun to feel like our own private universe, and we liked it that way.

To read the rest of the article, visit Women’s Adventure Magazine:
http://www.womensadventuremagazine.com/hikingbackpacking/making-thru-hiker-part-6-whos-besides/

The Making of a Thru-Hiker, Part 5: The Flood!

Don’t worry, written in 2013, this is my fifth post for “The Making of a Thru-Hiker” column (in Women’s Adventure Magazine): The Flood!

flooded gear room

flooded gear room

In the middle of the night of September 11, 2013, floodwaters began to pour through our downstairs half-basement of five furnished rooms. A storm had stalled over the Front Range of the Rockies, and it had been raining for days. Before it was over, eight people would die, mountain towns would be evacuated, hundreds of homes would be washed away, thousands more would be damaged, roads and wastewater infrastructure would be destroyed.

We’d actually been out hiking that day in the drenching rain. Pacific Crest Trail hikers who had survived all kinds of weather on our 2,663-mile trek, rain never kept us from our hikes.

To read the rest of the article, visit Women’s Adventure Magazine:
http://www.womensadventuremagazine.com/hikingbackpacking/making-thru-hiker-part-5-flood/

The Making of a Thru-Hiker, Part 4: Water?!

My fourth post for “The Making of a Thru-Hiker” column (in Women’s Adventure Magazine): Water?!

Gail with champagne

Gail with champagne

My friend Lise vowed to airlift in champagne to me while I hiked the Pacific Crest Trail. “You can’t possibly go six months without champagne,” she said. “I won’t stand for it.”
“I’ll just have to make do,” I said.
“Make do? You mean like with prosecco or cava?”

To read the rest of the article, visit Women’s Adventure Magazine:
http://www.womensadventuremagazine.com/hikingbackpacking/making-thru-hiker-part-4-water/

 

The Making of a Thru-hiker, Part 3: Should a Young Woman Thru-hike Solo?

My third post for “The Making of a Thru-Hiker” column (in Women’s Adventure Magazine): Should a Young Woman Thru-Hike Solo?

Gail on the Pacific Crest Trail

This message from a reader threw me into a soul-searching tizzy:

“What would you say to a twenty-year-old woman who wants to hike the entire Pacific Crest Trail but doesn’t have a partner to hike with? I’m her mom, and after reading your book I Promise Not to Suffer: A Fool for Love Hikes the Pacific Crest Trail, I don’t think it’s safe for her to attempt this alone.”

To read the rest of the article, visit Women’s Adventure Magazine:
http://www.womensadventuremagazine.com/hikingbackpacking/should-a-young-woman-thru-hike-solo/