Archives for June 2015

Continental Divide Trail #14: Wyoming Wildlife

From grizzly bears and wolves to buffalo, Wyoming teems with wildlife.


Gail had a wild ride on the World’s Largest Jackalope!


We’re deep in grizzly and wolf country, and Porter saw these enormous wolf tracks on his way out of the Wind River Range.


We each carry bear spray on our hikes separately and together, here above Togwotee Pass.


Amber remains imperturbable.


A giant herd of buffalo caused a traffic jam on US 287!

Continental Divide Trail #13: Wind River Range, WY!

“The Continental Divide Trail is by far the most challenging outdoor adventure I’ve ever attempted,” Porter says, “and the Wind River Range is the most challenging and magnificent part of the CDT thus far.”

“I forded lots of wide, deep creeks, and prepared to swim with my pack on my back where the current was fast.”

“The snow above 10,000 feet in elevation was so deep that I often sank up to mid-thigh. I listened for the gurgle of icy creeks beneath. Navigation was tough because the trail was hidden under snow.”


Gail and Amber drove deep into the Wind River Range to meet Porter for his resupply.

We stayed in this wonderful cabin at Big Sandy Lodge, so remote there was no electricity, internet, or cell coverage–just plenty of time to hike and meditate. Natasha and Wes took great care of us, and Natasha made delicious breakfasts, bagged lunches, and dinners.



Porter arrived, and we opened a killer Malbec to drink from under our mosquito head nets.


 

 

Here are Gail and Amber hiking their own hike in the Wind River Range.


We were recently interviewed by the international Adventure Sports Podcast about both our Pacific Crest Trail and Continental Divide Trail adventures:  http://www.adventuresportspodcast.com/2015/06/ep-050-gail-and-porter-storey-hiking.html

 

Continental Divide Trail #12: The Great Basin, WY!

This wild white horse came to check on Porter as he hiked through a thunderstorm in the Great Basin of Wyoming.


The Great Basin is known for being thick with ticks, but Porter came through tick-free, thanks to coating his pants, gaiters, socks, and shoes with permethrin and subjecting himself to his tick-inspector’s standards.

As a reward, Amber climbed up to post this sign on the Dairy Land in Lander.


We visited NOLS, the National Outdoor Leadership School in Lander, where Porter’s love for outdoor adventure began at the age of sixteen. He was part of the 1968 graduating class in NOLS’s third year.


My adventures finding Porter on mazes of unmarked dirt roads out in the middle of nowhere continue. We celebrated our respective victories at Cowfish Restaurant.